Vinyl Siding: Vinyl siding is tough and comes in a variety of colors and textures. Sophisticated manufacturing techniques create products that do a surprisingly fine job of mimicking wood-grain lap siding, wood shingles and even stone.  Vinyl siding is lightweight and, in many instances, can be installed directly over existing materials, so it’s a good retrofit option.  , insulated vinyl siding features a layer of expanded polystyrene foam, providing an insulating value of R-2 to R-6. Insulated vinyl is on the checklist of items that can help a house achieve Energy Star qualification.

Steel Siding offers many profiles and colors- all of which have been expertly designed and finished to reflect the natural grain of traditional wood siding. This universal siding is suitable for nearly every style of home, and is a consistent performer in even the most severe climate.  Manufactured not to rot, flake, crack, rust or chip with heavy-duty construction hides wall imperfections, and its corrosion-resistant and non-combustible properties add to your home’s protection and your peace of mind.

Fiber Cement Siding.  The current darling of the siding industry, fiber cement has earned a reputation for stability and low maintenance. It’s made from a mix of wood pulp, cement, clay and sand, and it can be molded to mimic wood clapboard, shingles, stucco and masonry. It readily accepts paint, and most manufacturers offer an array of factory-applied finishes.  Fiber-cement siding resists expanding and contracting with changes in humidity and temperature, so caulk and paint really hold up. It’s fire-resistant, termite-proof and it won’t rot.

Engineered wood siding is made of wood fibers and exterior-grade resins. It’s tough, strong and can stand up to extreme weather conditions. It comes in a variety of styles and textures, including beaded lap, rough-sawn clapboard and look-alike wood shingles. It comes ready-to-paint, primed or with factory finishes.  Engineered wood compares to fiber cement and real wood for durability.  Borate compounds added to the mixture make engineered wood siding impervious to insects